Steal these slides

Click images to view full size originals.

Industrial Age MedicineLast weekend I stumbled across the “attic” of Tom Ferguson MD, who was the “George Washington of patient empowerment,” as CNN put it this month, citing his work since 1975 to create a world of freedom and power for patients.

(Patients? That’s you. Thank him.)

Those familiar with this blog know about the white paper DocTom’s team completed after his death in 2006. But I didn’t know some of his earlier writings are around on www.DocTom.com, a modest web site including a few old slide shows. They’re sans speaker notes, but the good stuff is the images: you can get the drift.

Information Age Medicine

 

My favorites (above) are #88 and #89 from his 2003 slides. Here’s my narrative:

In the industrial age, the means of production and ability to create value were centralized in massive facilities. If you didn’t own the factory, you didn’t have freedom and power.

In the information age, those with access to information have access to power and can create value.

Those slides were made in 1995, when the Web had just been born, but they hit the nail on the head: today we have access to tremendous resources, and that empowers and enables us.

Please don’t interpret these slides as meaning that in the world of the future there will be no doctors. That’s idiotic. Rather, Tom’s vision is that “we the people” have a lot more ability to contribute than was once thought. And both costs and quality can improve as a result.

Compelling evidence to support this was collected into the white paper (above). Further independent evidence from around the world is provided by PCPCC (the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative), about which I wrote on my blog in May, including a few of their slides.

Steal these slides. Show them to others, put them in your decks when you give talks. And look at those PCPCC slides, with their data on cost and quality. It’s a new world out there – feed your head!

Print

Posted in: policy issues | positive patterns | reforming hc | trends & principles

 

 

Comments

15 Responses to “Steal these slides”

  1. FYI: The RSS subscription link on the homepage is pointing to an invalid Feedburner page. The links embedded in the head of your pages works great, though.

  2. Thanks for letting us know about this. Don’t know what went wrong – we’ll fix it asap.

  3. Ted Eytan says:

    Stolen!

    We should have made more progress in 13 years. Let’s fix that.

  4. Cindy Throop says:

    @ePatientDave Taking a look: Time to review again DocTom’s 1995 slides – Industrial Age vs Information Age http://is.gd/1fafE

  5. ePatientDave says:

    @cindythroop Time to review again DocTom’s 1995 slides – Industrial Age vs Information Age http://is.gd/1fafE

  6. Cindy Throop says:

    @ePatientDave Taking a look: Time to review again DocTom’s 1995 slides – Industrial Age vs Information Age http://is.gd/1fafE

  7. ehealthgr says:

    @epatientGR check this http://bit.ly/aOP3SS & http://bit.ly/aRg9Lc Καλημέρα

  8. Hi
    I know we are very sadly only left with the slides but it would be great of someone could explain more about the encouraged/discouraged scale on each slide. What were the factors encouraging a drive towards tertiary care before and against it now/in the future? I ask because to me that is probably the social and cultural factors around system change are probably the most important and the hardest to change.
    I’m also curious as to whether the same factors are relevant in the UK as in the US ie how much does the funding of healthcare determine which slide we are on?
    Thanks,
    Anne Marie

  9. carlosrizo says:

    Stealing these slides. I invite you to do the same! | e-Patients.net http://bit.ly/aOP3SS (via @ePatientDave)

  10. epatientdave says:

    RT @carlosrizo: Stealing these slides. I invite you to do the same! | e-Patients.net http://bit.ly/aOP3SS

  11. RT @ePatientDave: RT @carlosrizo: Stealing these slides. I invite you to do the same! | e-Patients.net http://bit.ly/aOP3SS #ptsafety

  12. Tami Swartz says:

    RT @SafetyNurse: RT @ePatientDave: RT @carlosrizo: Stealing these slides. I invite u 2 do the same! | e-Patients.net http://bit.ly/aOP3SS

  13. Mary Jo Deering says:

    I love the description of Tom as a founding father of patient engagement. His message will never grow old. And thanks to these slides, successive generations of consumer and patient empowerment advocates will always have a place to start from and return to as they move through the evolving eHealth landscape.

  14. On Twitter today (6.5 years later!) I saw an updated version of these slides – which appeared in the BMJ, 2010! “Adoption, non-adoption, and abandonment of a personal electronic health record: case study of HealthSpace”

Leave a Reply