“How to become a more effective e-patient” (and clinician): lecture at Duke by Dr. Charles Smith

Well, here’s a treat: Dr. Charles Smith, a founder of the Society for Participatory Medicine, recently gave a lecture at Duke titled “How to Become a More Effective e-Patient.” Here it is, in four YouTube segments.

“Charlie,” as we all call him, is a wonderful guy. He’s co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Participatory Medicine and was Doc Tom Ferguson’s physician. He’s been walking this walk for many years, and here he shares his personal advice – not just for patients but for health professionals who want to learn this participatory thing.

(The “Joe & Terry” he mentions are our founders Joe and Terry Graedon of People’s Pharmacy, longtime Duke associates.)

An audio-only version is at bottom. Here are the videos.

Part 1


Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Added August 23:
Audio Links (MP3 files):
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

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Posted in: key people | net-friendly docs | positive patterns | pt/doc co-care | Why PM

 

 

Comments

6 Responses to ““How to become a more effective e-patient” (and clinician): lecture at Duke by Dr. Charles Smith”

  1. Annie Stith (@Gr8fulAnnie) says:

    Hey, Dave!

    I’ll bet that video series is informative and engaging. Unfortunately, now that YouTubne has switched some of its video format to run with Adobe Flash Player. Adobe and RIM, which is the developer of BlackBerry’s OS, have yet to come out with Flash Player for BlackBerry’s
    OS 5.0.

    In the spirit of accessibility, have you ever considered
    posting either the speaker’s notes or transcripts for video?

    Annie

    • Annie, I hear you; do you have any suggestions for how to get this done? Our resources are scarce – suggestions are welcome.

      I have people asking for ebook and audio versions of my book – same situation. I’m all ears.

      • Annie Stith (@Gr8fulAnnie) says:

        Hey, Dave!

        I’ve not yet posted a video and been thru the process. I asked a couple of bloggers who have. For transcripts, one used a volunteer while the other has a paid employee. Apparently what they did was transcribe directly off the video.

        They both said that, when the speaker uses notes, they’ve been happy to share a copy when contacted at their office the next day. There aren’t always notes, tho, and if there are, they (obviously) won’t cover any Q&A.

        Personally, having transcribed before, I’d suggest a tape recorder near the podium. I found a tape easier to transcribe from than video.

        I’m not familiar with them, but I’ve heard there are MP3 recorders so that the talk could be a downloadable audio.

        I wish all that were more help.

        Annie

  2. Annie Stith (@Gr8fulAnnie) says:

    Thanks, Dave! I’m glad it worked. :)

    Going to give them a listen.

    Annie

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