Guest Post Guidelines

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This is the blog of the Society for Participatory Medicine. As our blog readership grows, we’re increasingly asked about guest posts. Here are some preliminary guidelines.

Scope and purpose:

As we said the other day, on this blog we hope to “host discussions about the present and the future that will advance the cause of participatory medicine.” Examples:

  • Raise awareness of issues related to participatory medicine: the new world of engaged, empowered patients who network with each other and partner actively with their healthcare professionals – shifting “from being mere passengers to    responsible drivers of their health.”
  • Track the progress of participatory medicine – behavioral (e.g. Susannah Fox’s work at Pew), technical (as new tools and capabilities come online), cultural (on both the patient side and the professional side), and governmental.
  • Provide patients (and others) with tools and information to help them be informed, empowered consumers of health information and services. Examples are our posts about understanding research, statistics, and journal articles.

Those are examples, not an exhaustive list. Anything non-commercial that serves the movement could be welcome. We have two distinctive categories:

  • How I became an e-Patient.” Usually these are stories of awakening – a patient or family member realizing that they needed become engaged in healthcare, not just be a passive recipient. Ideally, tell the situation you were in, the crisis or moment of decision you faced, what you did when you got it in gear, the outcome, and how your view of the world has changed.
  • Why I Joinedthe Society for Participatory Medicine. The purpose here is to let potential members see why you felt moved to join. Write to illuminate someone for whom this whole idea is new, who might think “What do you mean, patients as active partners to doctors??” Explain why you’re drawn to this new approach – what you see as newly possible.

Writer’s guidelines:

  • Any word count is welcome, but remember that longer posts rarely get read to the end, so it makes your work as a writer more difficult. (Your job is to deliver value to our readers, which won’t happen if they don’t stay engaged.)
  • Reading level of our posts range from grade level 8 to 10, per Microsoft Word’s Flesch-Kincaid score. (In other words, it’s easier for people to read if you avoid unnecessarily long words, sentences, and paragraphs.)
  • Good writing is good. It helps if you have an attention-earning lead, a well-formed middle, and a conclusion that concludes.
  • “e-Patient takeaways” are sometimes important: what can readers learn from this? For examples, see the posts in this http://e-patients.net/index.php?s=takeaway site search for “takeaways.”

To submit a post, write to the blog team at blog at participatorymedicine.org. Expect an acknowledgement within 24 hours. If we like it, we’ll ask for a brief bio and a photo (informal is fine).

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Comments

9 Responses to “Guest Post Guidelines”

  1. I am an enthusiastic support of using digital technologies to improve health, accelerate medical innovation and increase the amount of control we have over medical decisions.

    However… (and I would not mind being a guest blogger on this and related subjects) it is important to make sure the medium is not skewing decisions in favor of health insurers or government ‘experts.’ It is important to make sure that fearmongering and skepticism regarding new technologies is called out. And it is critical that ehealth not fall prey ‘magical thinking’ and demonstrate improved outcomes or more value, convenience, etc..Seems to me that no healthy skepticism is tolerated and that epatientism can quickly become a religion wherein people like me who don’t buy the dogma are excommunicated or ignored..

  2. Mark Boguski says:

    Dave,
    Michele & I did a presentation today at the Harvard School of Public Health on “Health Communication at the Nexus of Social Media & Popular Culture.”
    PDF here: http://bit.ly/eMJqk5
    Would you be interested in a post on this?
    Thanks,
    Mark

    • Hi Mark – as the post says, we invite submissions that match the scope and purpose described.

      As we’ve discussed before, viewing health issues through the lens of celebrity news coverage is interesting but isn’t inherently participatory. On the other hand, if Lady Gaga did something participatory, that would be relevant. An example is our posts about Dennis Quaid’s work after his twins were severely injured, as he and his wife got involved in improving healthcare.

      • Mark Boguski says:

        Dave – You raise an interesting distinction between participatory medicine for personal use and participatory medicine on behalf of society (the Dennis Quaid example).
        I’ve always felt that participatory medicine, as we commonly think of it, requires a level of education and assertiveness that not everyone has and therefore potentially leaves a lot of people out in the cold.
        Celebrity illnesses as cueing events for health education are missed opportunities to reach those with different, perhaps more passive, learning styles and modes of social discourse. They may even create new ways for patients to feel comfortable talking about certain topics with their physicians. See our recent lecture at the Harvard School of Public Health here:
        http://www.medpagetoday.com/Blogs/24696

  3. Hello,

    I am the Community Relations Manager of Children’s Mercy Family Health Partners. We are a Medicaid managed care health plan owned by Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City. We are a not-for-profit safety net health plan whose goal is to help make our members healthy.

    In order to do that, we have created two video channels on YouTube with health education videos targeting those with low health literacy. The channels are available at http://www.youtube.com/cmfhp1 and http://www.youtube.com/cmfhpspanish (Spanish language channel).

    I would like to invite you to use any one of our videos on your blog. The videos contain information on pregnancy, asthma, diabetes, weight management, lead poisoning prevention, health care provider education, dental and more. We will soon have more videos and a podcast coming out on autism as well.

    Thank you and please let me know if you have any questions or concerns!

  4. Hello,

    My name is Maggie and I was wondering if you took paid guest posts on your site, e-patients.net/?
    Not a traditional “guest post” but one you’d be compensated for and have complete editorial control over.
    We do a lot of work with education, health and news related content.

    I’m part of a business that does high-end brand placements worked into guest posts on a variety of
    subjects. The posts don’t advocate or review our clients, they are informational and/or newsy articles
    that are made to fit the feel and flow of your site. We include a reference link to our clients amongst
    other topical links inside the content. We’d provide the article, written by a domain expert, and money
    for you to review and post it upon your approval.

    (If you don’t take guest posts, we also have arrangements where we discuss your upcoming post and
    find one in which a link makes sense and pay you to include it.)

    Is that something that you would be interested in? If so, do you have any other sites?

    Thanks,
    Maggie Durango

    • Maggie, read the post, will you?

      In the last 36 hours I’m suddenly seeing a slew of invitations going to patient bloggers to accept paid links etc. Whoever came up with this brilliant (not) idea doesn’t understand thing one about patient blogs.

  5. Good morning,

    You Health Network (tureddesalud.com) is a social network focused on professional and health services to the community in general. It is present in 18 Latin American countries, aiming to contribute to improving the quality of life of people and be a support tool for professionals and health services.
    No doubt, social networks today have become the cornerstone for communication between more than 540 million people and the use of these networks, causing an irreversible effect on the way we all communicate or seek what we need. In tureddesalud.com, we make available to all of you, a powerful tool for Health 2.0, allowing them to go day by day covering information and communication needs of modern society that demands that breaks leadership paradigms in search of marking their own pattern.

    Grateful for your kind attention and waiting for your prompt response,

    Frank Morales
    Creator – Founder
    frank@tureddesalud.com

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