Why PM


key people, patient networks, positive patterns, pts as teachers, social media, Why PM

Teaching Health Communication with Participatory Medicine Highlights

In the Spring of 2016 I had the opportunity to teach the course New Media and Health Communication for an undergraduate class at The College of New Jersey. The class, designed by Dr. Yifeng Hu, already included an introduction to participatory medicine and patient participation in their own healthcare. With the help of numerous colleagues from the Society for […]

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DocTom10, Why PM

Warmly Remembering Tom Ferguson & His Legacy #DocTom10

Next in our #DocTom10 series, which started here.  I first met Tom Ferguson in 1994 online (where else?) when he reached out via email to chat about online support groups. I was still in graduate school at the time, and he had come across my indexes of Internet support groups for health and mental health concerns. […]

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chapter reviews, DocTom10, reforming hc, Why PM

#DocTom10, post 3: The preface and the paradigm

Third in our #DocTom10 series, which started here.  Yesterday I asked that you download Ferguson’s white paper, the manifesto he was working on when he died unexpectedly, ten years ago tomorrow. Today we’ll look at the preface. The lost section: questioning the paradigm When I first read the White Paper in January 2008, this section was […]

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chapter reviews, DocTom10, Why PM

Honoring the memory of “Doc Tom” Ferguson, ten years after his death

“Doc Tom” Ferguson, the source of our Society for Participatory Medicine, died unexpectedly ten years ago this week, April 14, 2006. In the coming days we’ll run a series of posts remembering his work and vision. Especially, we’re going to walk through the seminal document about this movement, the now-famous “e‑Patient White Paper,” a free download […]

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positive patterns, Why PM

Dr. Danny Sands explains what participatory medicine is and isn’t (great 5 minute video)

Dr. Danny Sands is one of the co-founders of our Society for Participatory Medicine, a great primary care physician, and a real thought leader who’s been doing this modern stuff for twenty years. (He co-authored the first journal paper on how to do patient-clinician email without ruining the doc’s life – in 1998!) Last month […]

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positive patterns, reforming hc, trends & principles, Why PM

“When someone else speaks for you, you lose”: patient empowerment as a civil rights movement

Here’s something I’ve never done: I’m capturing a comment from this blog five years ago and making it a post of its own, so it’s easier to find, because I think this is going to be more and more of an issue. It’s clearer and clearer that, as SPM board member-at-large Peggy Zuckerman says, patient empowerment is becoming […]

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pts as teachers, reforming hc, trends & principles, Why PM

Watch: Webcast – patient engagement from the patient’s point of view

A guest post from member Jeffrey Halbstein-Harris – this is a small slice of a longer piece he used as the basis for a speaking engagement. This is a call to consumers: my brothers and sisters who rely on healthcare and its infrastructure’s support throughout their life. I was leaving a meeting of healthcare policy experts […]

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net-friendly docs, news & gossip, pt/doc co-care, Why PM

New Participatory Medicine Resources for Providers

Ever since the formation of the Society for Participatory Medicine we have discussed curating and sharing resources about participatory medicine. The resources might be videos, websites, blog posts, tutorials, and other online resources that could benefit patients, caregivers, and clinicians. For obvious reasons we thought to focus first on patient/caregiver resources. But because of the many […]

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policy issues, positive patterns, pt/doc co-care, trends & principles, Why PM

Mythbusting, “demanding patient” edition


We’d bet good money that anyone who identifies as an e-patient has been led to believe that their desire to participate actively in their medical care marks them as a “demanding patient.” The perception of demanding patients is that they’re behaving like spoiled divas at a medi-spa, with their demands driving up incidence of unnecessary […]

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