Danny Sands

 

general, policy issues, positive patterns, pt/doc co-care, trends & principles

OpenNotes hits TEN MILLION patient level

As regular readers know, for years we’ve been blogging here about OpenNotes, in which patients and their designated caregivers can read every word their clinicians write, so they can be more informed. The OpenNotes tagline, “Doctors and patients on the same page,” is no joke: I was one of the subjects in the study, and I’ve […]

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e-patient stories, social media

Patient solves difficult diagnosis using … an online image sharing service??

The times, they are a-changin’: medicine is realizing there can be gold found on the internet, amid all the garbage that’s also there. Items: In 2014 a European government started buying Google Ads telling patients “Don’t Google it, check a reliable source.” Why is that an either-or?? Smart e-patients do both! This is a good use of taxpayer […]

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general

Meet Donna Cryer, new co-chair of SPM

At 10 ET today (Feb 25) Donna will be a guest at the White House Precision Medicine Initiative, with several other members of our Society. Watch it on livestream. See also our post on the PMI event a year ago by then-president Nick Dawson. I’m thrilled to announce that after seven years as founding co-chair […]

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medical records, policy issues

NPR Shots: Small Violations Of Medical Privacy Can Hurt Patients And Corrode Trust

One pillar of participatory medicine, as SPM co-chair Dr. Danny Sands often says, is access to our medical records: “How can patients participate if they can’t see what I see??” But a major impediment to free-flowing information is incompetence or malfeasance in protecting our data, which makes some people want to clamp down. Patients and […]

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positive patterns, Why PM

Dr. Danny Sands explains what participatory medicine is and isn’t (great 5 minute video)

Dr. Danny Sands is one of the co-founders of our Society for Participatory Medicine, a great primary care physician, and a real thought leader who’s been doing this modern stuff for twenty years. (He co-authored the first journal paper on how to do patient-clinician email without ruining the doc’s life – in 1998!) Last month […]

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news & gossip, patient networks, positive patterns, pt/doc co-care, reforming hc, Stanford Medicine X, trends & principles

Big BMJ supplement on Patient Centred Care – with many SPM and MedX voices

This is a great week for SPM, for our colleagues at the Stanford Medicine X conference, and for everyone else who’s been working for years to shift medicine’s thinking about the role of the patient: Yesterday the BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) released a big, 21 article “Spotlight” supplement on “patient centred care.” The print edition is due out tomorrow, […]

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general, policy issues, positive patterns, reforming hc

The movement gets real: one of Doc Tom’s sightings gets $28 million with Iora Health

There are times in a movement when value is revealed and recognized, and you know something real is happening. In the engaged-patient movement, the first I noticed was when Amy Tenderich’s Diabetes Mine blog (and its community) was acquired several years ago. That takes it from what some people might view as “clubby” to tangible […]

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e-pts resources

CHCF’s iHealthBeat podcast on online communities

One of the California Health Care Foundation’s regular projects is iHealthBeat, “Reporting technology’s impact on healthcare.” Wednesday they released a five minute podcast on patient communities, which are of course a core activity of engaged patients and thus of participatory medicine. I was interviewed for it, as was the highly participatory Dr. Eric Topol, author of […]

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medical records, policy issues, positive patterns, pt/doc co-care

OpenNotes in the news: Now 3 million patients – and mental health, too

We’ve often written here about the OpenNotes study (here’s a site search), which documented that when patients can see what their clinicians wrote, the sky doesn’t fall; instead, all kinds of good things happen. This is game-changing, even world-changing for how we conduct medicine: As I’ve often said, “People perform better when they’re informed better,” […]

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