Institute Of Medicine

 

ethics, general, policy issues, positive patterns, pts as teachers, research issues, Why PM

Partnering with patients – about patient centered RESEARCH METHODS

This is a long post, but it strikes deep to the core of the transformation underway in medicine, even in the science that drives medicine. It appears the world is starting to change, in a very good way. We’ve often written about the changing culture of medicine, as the professions begin to understand the value […]

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found on the net, hc's problem list, policy issues

What if we treated substandard *info* like substandard drugs? (Riff on an IOM report)

Major typo fix, 3:23pm – “they’re giving” is not same as “they’re given”! Sorry. This note arrived today from the Institute of Medicine. I’m in DC at the moment, at a big briefing by the Health Affairs policy journal about patient engagement, and a key issue keeps coming up: the problems that happen when patients […]

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policy issues, reforming hc, trends & principles

Are patients knights, knaves, or pawns?

Sachin Jain and John Rother’s JAMA commentary, “Are Patients Knights, Knaves, or Pawns?” is an article that begs to be shared.  The first time I read it I had to stand up, I was so excited — how can I design a survey to capture these questions?! was my first thought. My second thought was […]

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policy issues, pts as teachers, research issues

President’s Cancer Panel: Input, Please

What evidence would you bring to convince cancer researchers and policy makers to pay attention to how the internet is changing health and health care? That’s my challenge for the Dec. 14 meeting of the President’s Cancer Panel, “The Future of Cancer Research: Accelerating Scientific Innovation” (PDF of the agenda).

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patient networks, policy issues

Health 2.0 DC: Passion and Execution at Scale

I think conferences are deeply affected by the spirit of their host city.  San Francisco has its hackers and dreamers, Boston has its entrepreneurs and ivy, Paris has its pomp and worldliness. At Health 2.0 DC yesterday, my city showed that it has passion and execution — at scale. Leave it to others to point […]

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news & gossip, positive patterns, pt/doc co-care, pts as teachers, reforming hc, trends & principles

Participatory Medicine in Time magazine

Re Time‘s article “Group Therapy” in the February 8, 2010 issue, arriving on newsstands now: Time‘s freelance reporter Bonnie Rochman contacted our Susannah Fox to discuss her remarks at the Institute of Medicine last October.

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policy issues, reforming hc, trends & principles, Why PM

The Invisible Stakeholder:
Why America Needs a Patient-in-Chief

The following is the proposal I submitted Tuesday, to speak at O’Reilly / TechWeb’s Government 2.0 Expo, May 25–27 in Washington. ______________________________ The Invisible Stakeholder: Why America Needs a Patient-in-Chief   “These are exciting and very promising times for the widespread application of information technology to improve the quality of healthcare delivery, while also reducing costs, […]

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Why PM

Superheroes and rock stars at the Institute of Medicine

Update: National Cancer Policy Forum published a book based on the workshop, A Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice: A Rapid Learning System for Cancer Care, which you can buy, read online for free, or download as a PDF. The discussion portion of this panel was captured in a short video. ___________________ The Institute of Medicine’s recent […]

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